• Tips for better sleep on the road

    Stephanie DeNote
    Business travel can be stressful, it’s true. The CWT Solutions Group even recently introduced a Travel Stress Index to help businesses quantify the cost of the stress on their traveling employees. Personally, I’ve found that the stress of business travel is even more magnified when I can’t seem to get a good night’s sleep while on the road.

    And why is it that business travel and blissful slumber aren’t exactly a match made in heaven? I’d say there are a variety of reasons:

    • man asleep in hotelThe business at hand: If you’ve arrived the night before a big presentation or meeting, you may find your mind is racing with the details of the next day. Mental shutdown is not an easy task.
    • Environment: The hotel room may be too warm or too cold, and the bed is likely different than the one you’re accustomed to sleeping on at home.
    • Schedule: Business travel often involves early mornings full of meetings and late nights entertaining clients or attending events – this may or may not match up with your usual schedule at home.

     

    Of these factors, the one that I usually try to take control of is my environment. For me it’s all about temperature and noise.

    • Temperature: If the hotel room is too warm, there’s no way I’ll fall asleep. To combat this, I generally travel with a small travel fan. There are plenty of small, battery-operated options that are easy to pack and can make a big difference in your comfort level at the hotel.
    • Sound: When the room is too quiet, I can hear every little noise coming from inside or outside. And if I have the misfortune of getting a hotel room near the elevator or ice machine, drifting off to sleep can be a challenge. I like having some sort of white-noise machine. There are options for travel-size sound machines, or even more convenient are the variety of sound machine apps you can download for your Smartphone.

     

    What tips do you recommend for a better night’s sleep on the road (and hopefully a more productive next day)?

7 Responsesso far.

  1. Jim McMullan says:

    I heard a sleep specialist mention the light in the room. All the little lights from the cell phone, the laptop, the bedside clock, etc, add up to a well lit room and a sleep disturbance. I make those items are covered or put away now.

  2. Jim McMullan says:

    “make sure”

  3. Great point, Jim. That can make a big difference. Thanks for the tip!

  4. Stephanie DeNote Stephanie DeNote says:

    Thanks for the comment Jim! I also try and cover all the “device” lights while they are charging overnight. When you are on the road and not in your own bed and need to be well rested for the next day of work, every little trick counts!

  5. Bob A. says:

    For me it’s not always the temperature, but it is almost always the humidity. Hotel air just seems dry to me and I find that very uncomfortable.

  6. Nikki McLain Nikki McLain says:

    I always bring a sleep mask with me.

  7. Veronica says:

    I totally agree with the lighting in my hotel room; I was having trouble sleeping on my frequent business trips for Dish, going beyond being in a foreign hotel bed. I switched off everything electronic except for my phone for the alarm; my phone dims, and what a difference it made. I also thought about what helps to relax and bring peaceful sleep at home, which for me is a movie before bed. We all use apps when we travel so it wasn’t a big deal to download the Dish Remote Access app; watching a movie on my iPad before bed has been helpful to me. I know some of you traveling ladies would hate to miss your favorite show; this app is great for that too. Happy Trails!